Sounds like DEFRA’s been listening

Back in March I posted an article on LinkedIn arguing the case for future farm support to be channelled into technology solutions that can deliver productivity gains and better deliver of social and environmental goods.
 
Well it seems the UK government is listening. Its publication of the Agriculture Bill last month which will determine farming support for a post-Brexit UK (noting that there will be differences in devolved administrations), caught my eye on three counts:
 
  • The phasing out of direct support payment
  • The introduction of funding for farmer-led R&D and collaboration on productivity innovation
  • A new Environmental Land Management (ELM) scheme
 
Of course the devil is in the detail, but on first glance (and at odds with some farming leaders) I like the look of what’s being proposed. Here’s why:
 
First, phasing out of direct support finally puts an end to the subsidy crutch that for too long has made British farming unproductive. We lag hopelessly behind many of our major competitors on this metric and while transitioning to a brave new world won’t be easy, it is vital to give farming the boot up the backside to become more innovative by necessity.
 
The fact that there may no longer be a requirement to farm to receive progressively reduced payments over seven years is a good thing. It gives farmers wishing to exit a dignified means of doing so, and might even start to make land occupation (rents or purchase) a little more reflective of economic viability – a good thing for innovating farmers and new entrants alike.
 
Second – and the one which in many ways I am most excited about – is the directing of funds towards farmer-led R&D and innovation. This is potentially game changing and totally in tune with a more technology-driven future for the sector. 
 
Back in March I noted the announcement of the Innovate UK Transforming Food Production fund of £90m as being a welcome start, but really just a drop in the ocean. I really hope the government through the Bill is bold enough to provide significant budget into this farmer-led area and not just pay it lip service.  There are some exciting initiatives we are involved in that fall squarely into what the government is driving at here. But this funding MUST encourage innovation that is focused on food production as well as other areas. As I wrote in the spring, more food is needed in the next 50 years than has been consumed in the entire history of humanity! It’s a big challenge that needs big thinking.
 
Third is the ELM scheme. For me there is also a huge technology role here. Delivery of public goods has to be measurable and we are now in the era of big (and small) data, machine learning and AI that could deliver real transformation in ways that can transparently demonstrate public value. The taxpayer should expect nothing less.
 
Moving away from direct support and into the territory of funding innovation and targeted activity is a sea change and something I believe to be a good thing. Ultimately, this approach is about the development of solutions which should, over time, stand on their own two feet. That’s what we are focused on and why so many of our clients come to us asking the question: “How will digital and data help us do the job better?” 
 
So, yes I understand why farm leaders are concerned. But this is not the time to cling onto the past. It is absolutely the time to tear up the rule book, imagine what the future should look like, and back truly innovative thinking and innovative farmers to get us there.  

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